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Senior year for Duke’s Class of 2020 did not go as expected. As they look toward their long-delayed, eagerly anticipated, in-person commencement ceremony on Sept. 26, members of the Class of 2020 share their memories of Duke and how they learned to cherish ordinary moments of connection and community.  Katie Cassedy  Katie graduated in 2020 with an economics major and a minor in visual media studies.  She is currently a UK Agency Associate in LinkedIn’s Business Leadership Program… read more about The Class of 2020 Remembers Duke »

Four visiting humanities scholars from historically Black colleges and universities and liberal-arts institutions arrived at Duke this August to collaborate with Duke students, faculty and staff. Their projects will cover commemoration practices, early Christian manuscripts, a 17th century Mexican philosopher and the ephemeral nature of digital projects. The fellows are part of Humanities Unbounded, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded initiative designed to nurture collaboration and inventive expressions of the… read more about Duke Welcomes New Cohort of Visiting Humanities Scholars from HBCUs and Liberal-Arts Schools »

Four visiting humanities scholars from historically Black colleges and universities and liberal-arts institutions arrived at Duke this August to collaborate with Duke students, faculty and staff. Their projects will cover commemoration practices, early Christian manuscripts, a 17th century Mexican philosopher and the ephemeral nature of digital projects. The fellows are part of Humanities Unbounded, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded initiative designed to nurture collaboration and inventive expressions of the… read more about Duke Welcomes New Cohort of Visiting Humanities Scholars from HBCUs and Liberal-Arts Schools »

When he was an undergraduate political science student, Kerry Haynie was never taught about the 1921 Tulsa massacre. Nor was there much discussion about the role of race in the founding political documents of this country or much examination of how race influenced public services such as sewer lines and zoning. In one sense, a lot has changed. In 2021, Duke’s faculty includes a strong lineup of leading scholars who examine how race is embedded in issues that cross all the schools of the university. This fall, many of… read more about University Course Raises Race as a Central Element of Undergraduate Education »

When he was an undergraduate political science student, Kerry Haynie was never taught about the 1921 Tulsa massacre. Nor was there much discussion about the role of race in the founding political documents of this country or much examination of how race influenced public services such as sewer lines and zoning. In one sense, a lot has changed. In 2021, Duke’s faculty includes a strong lineup of leading scholars who examine how race is embedded in issues that cross all the schools of the university. This fall, many of… read more about University Course Raises Race as a Central Element of Undergraduate Education »

April 8, 5:00pm - April 8, 6:30pm “The white fathers told us, “I think, therefore I am.” The Black mother within each of us—the poet—whispers in our dreams: “I feel, therefore I can be free.” - Audre Lorde, "Poetry is Not a Luxury." Duke Senior and Spoken Verb President Allayne Thomas will facilitate a conversation between Zimbabwean American poet and Duke Professor of English Tsitsi Jaji and African-American Duke English Ph.D. Candidate Nicole Higgins. The night will focus on themes ranging from diaspora… read more about "I Feel, therefore I can be free": Harnessing the power of emotion in writing to heal. »

As part of its event series tgiFHI, the Franklin Humanities Institute is conducting interviews with its faculty speakers in order to familiarize broader audiences with the diversity of research approaches in the humanities, arts, and interpretive social sciences at Duke University. Roberto Dainotto is Professor of Literature, Italian, and International Comparative Studies. In this edited and condensed interview, he describes how the popularization of the novel occurred at the same moment as the politicization of the masses… read more about Meet Your Humanities Faculty: Roberto Dainotto »

As part of its event series tgiFHI, the Franklin Humanities Institute is conducting interviews with its faculty speakers in order to familiarize broader audiences with the diversity of research approaches in the humanities, arts, and interpretive social sciences at Duke University. Roberto Dainotto is Professor of Literature, Italian, and International Comparative Studies. In this edited and condensed interview, he describes how the popularization of the novel occurred at the same moment as the politicization of the masses… read more about Meet Your Humanities Faculty: Roberto Dainotto »

Speaker: Manu Karuka, Ph.D., Barnard (American Studies) Professor Karuka will speak about his book, Empire’s Tracks (University of California Press, 2019). Empire’s Tracks boldly reframes the history of the transcontinental railroad from the perspectives of the Cheyenne, Lakota, and Pawnee Native American tribes, and the Chinese migrants who toiled on its path. Karuka situates the railroad within the violent global histories of colonialism and capitalism. Through an examination of legislative, military, and business… read more about ICS Spring Keynote Lecture '21 - Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad »

This essay originally appeared on January 4, 2021 on the website Lausan. You can access the original piece here. In a year of crises, my summer was particularly heavy. From Kansas City, my birthplace where I organize today, to Hong Kong, my familial hometown, it felt as if both poles of my world were burning. My usual Instagram and WhatsApp feed was replaced with variations of the same cellphone video scenes: chemical agents and rubber bullets descending on crowds of young protestors each day. In the span of a… read more about From the Heartland to Hong Kong: The case for global abolition. The striking parallels between policing in Hong Kong and the US are no coincidence »

Samuel Daly, an assistant professor of African & African American Studies, International Comparative Studies and History, used his expertise on the history of policing in Nigeria to provide an analysis of the recent protests against the country's Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS). read more about Nigerians Got Their Abusive SARS Police Force Abolished – But Elation Soon Turned to Frustration  »

Samuel Daly, an assistant professor of African & African American Studies, International Comparative Studies and History, used his expertise on the history of policing in Nigeria to provide an analysis of the recent protests against the country's Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS). read more about Nigerians Got Their Abusive SARS Police Force Abolished – But Elation Soon Turned to Frustration  »

BY CORBIE HILL DECEMBER 09, 2020 | WINTER 2020 ISSUE In the spring of 2020, JaBria Bishop built her first video game. It was a 2D side-scroller—think Super Mario Brothers—which she believes she called Lunar Dreamscape. In it, a little girl wakes up in a lost world. Bishop’s idea for this whimsical game was for the players, too, to feel lost, so she designed it accordingly. “I wanted the player to also feel how the little girl feels,” she says. Bishop—today a senior; then a junior—was a student in… read more about "Games and Culture" course offers sociocultural understanding of play »

NetIndian profiles a new book by Sumathi Ramaswamy, James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of History and International Comparative Studies, in which the historian examines art that depicts Mahatma Ghandi. Read the article at NetIndian. read more about Gandhi in the Gallery: The Art Of Disobedience »

NetIndian profiles a new book by Sumathi Ramaswamy, James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of History and International Comparative Studies, in which the historian examines art that depicts Mahatma Ghandi. Read the article at NetIndian. read more about Gandhi in the Gallery: The Art Of Disobedience »

As part of its event series tgiFHI, the Franklin Humanities Institute is conducting interviews with its faculty speakers in order to familiarize broader audiences with the diversity of research approaches in the humanities, arts, and interpretive social sciences at Duke University. Dr. Jessica Namakkal is Assistant Professor of the Practice in International Comparative Studies; Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies; and History. In this edited and condensed interview, she describes the importance of geography and… read more about Meet Your Humanities Faculty: Jessica Namakkal »

As part of its event series tgiFHI, the Franklin Humanities Institute is conducting interviews with its faculty speakers in order to familiarize broader audiences with the diversity of research approaches in the humanities, arts, and interpretive social sciences at Duke University. Dr. Jessica Namakkal is Assistant Professor of the Practice in International Comparative Studies; Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies; and History. In this edited and condensed interview, she describes the importance of geography and… read more about Meet Your Humanities Faculty: Jessica Namakkal »

Although he left office nearly a decade ago, the man known to millions simply as Lula remains Brazil’s single most influential politician, says John French, Duke professor of history. Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva led strikes against the country’s military dictatorship, founded the Workers’ Party and became president of Latin America’s largest country after his fourth attempt at election in 2002. Lula has spoken out against the right-wing incumbent President Jair Bolsonaro, who has downplayed the COVID-19 pandemic and sabotaged… read more about Professor John French on Lula, Former Brazilian President (and the Country’s COVID-19 Problem) »