Global Criteria

Global courses are organized by a connective, transnational, comparative, or international approach to cultural, social, historical, political, economic, environmental, or discursive dynamics. Course content should not be delimited by a focus on one place or nation-state. Course content is theoretically informed and empirically engaged (ethnography, observation, interviews, archives, surveys, and statistical data; institutional, literary, artistic, cultural, commercial, or environmental artifacts, processes, or forms). Course content examines dynamics that occurred at any time from 1500 to the present, although it may include content that began in earlier periods.

Courses approach the above through one or more of the following nodes:

  1. institutions, organizations, or systems

  2. identities and lived experiences

  3. circulations, circuits, borders, and migrations

  4. social or other movements

  5. cultural productions and receptions

Region Criteria

Region courses focus on cultural, social, historical, political, economic, and/or identity dynamics; course content is theoretically informed; course content empirically engages with fieldwork, archives, literary, artistic, and cultural artifacts or processes, and/or statistical data; course content largely focuses on a particular place or region; and course content examines dynamics that occurred at any time from 1500 to the present, although it may include content that began in earlier periods.